American Airlines Extends Boeing 737 Max Flight Cancellations

American Airlines is extending cancellations of all Boeing 737 Max flights through Sept. 3 amid ongoing software fixes in the wake of two fatal crashes involving the model.

The country’s largest airline announced its decision on Sunday as it awaits recertification of the planes by the Federal Aviation Administration. The aircraft was previously canceled through Aug. 19.

The airline said it will try to move affected passengers to other aircraft models but that ultimately about 115 flights will be canceled per day because of the extension.

A Boeing 737 Max 8 jetliner being built for Turkish Airlines takes off on a test flight in Renton, Washington, on May 8.



A Boeing 737 Max 8 jetliner being built for Turkish Airlines takes off on a test flight in Renton, Washington, on May 8.

These cancellations may include flights on planes that are not Boeing 737 Max aircraft, in order to use the planes on Max routes that require coverage, the airline said.

The news comes a week after the FAA said a joint investigation with Boeing found that more than 300 planes may have been manufactured with faulty parts by a Boeing supplier.

The parts used on 737 Max and 737 NG planes “may be susceptible to premature failure or cracks,” the FAA said. It said it would mandate all affected parts to be removed and replaced within 10 days.

United Airlines and Southwest Airlines also include 737 Max planes in their fleets. Both airlines have canceled its flights into August.

The Boeing jet has been grounded since mid-March after an Ethiopian Airlines plane crashed. That catastrophe came five months after a similar crash involving a Lion Air flight in Indonesia.

Texas Governor Signs Law Raising The States Legal Smoking Age To 21

Texas has joined a growing number of states in banning the use and sale of tobacco products to those under the age of 21, with an exception to those in the military.

Gov. Greg Abbott (R) signed Senate Bill 21 into law on Friday, raising the legal age from 18. The new law, which will go into effect on Sept. 1, includes a ban on e-cigarette sales to those under 21.

Supporters of the ban argued that raising the purchasing age will save lives.

According to a report by the surgeon general, nearly 90 percent of smokers started smoking by the age of 18.



According to a report by the surgeon general, nearly 90 percent of smokers started smoking by the age of 18.

According to a report by the surgeon general, nearly 90 percent of smokers started smoking by the age of 18. The addiction kills more than 1,200 people a day, which is about half the number of youth or young adults who become regular smokers each day.

“Almost no one starts smoking after age 25,” the report states. “The younger youth are when they start using tobacco, the more likely they’ll be addicted.”

Similar bans have been passed in Arkansas, California, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, Virginia and Washington, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

Hundreds of cities have similar bans, while Beverly Hills, California, last week became the first city to ban tobacco sales to anyone, no matter their age, with exceptions for a few businesses.

A high school student uses a vaping device near a school campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts. E-cigarettes are the most common



A high school student uses a vaping device near a school campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts. E-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among youth.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has meanwhile blamed e-cigarettes for driving up tobacco use among high school students. Between 2017 and 2018, there was a 38 percent increase in tobacco use among such minors.

E-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among youth, ahead of cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, hookah and pipes, the CDC said.

Juul, the manufacturer of the most commonly sold e-cigarettes, has expressed support of banning such sales to youth.